Stephen Shames, “A boy tries on a coat at a  party office in Toledo, Ohio, 1971.” Scholar Alondra Nelson relates,

The Black Panther Party’s 1966 founding manifesto stated “We want  land, bread, housing, education, clothing, justice and peace.” Helping  disadvantaged communities to meet these needs was one of the activists’  main goals. To do this, the Party established a wide array of community  service or “survival” initiatives, including the People’s Free Clothing  Program depicted here.
Then there are the images within the picture; the images on the  wall. There is the iconic poster of Huey Newton seated in a wicker chair  brandishing both a sword and a rifle. There are several pieces of art  that appear to be the work of Emory Douglas, the Party’s Minister of  Culture. There’s also a familiar portrait of Eldridge Cleaver floating  just above the boy’s head. This “gallery” links the boy’s sartorial joy  and practical needs to the Black Panthers’ style and their politics.

Stephen Shames, “A boy tries on a coat at a party office in Toledo, Ohio, 1971.” Scholar Alondra Nelson relates,

The Black Panther Party’s 1966 founding manifesto stated “We want land, bread, housing, education, clothing, justice and peace.” Helping disadvantaged communities to meet these needs was one of the activists’ main goals. To do this, the Party established a wide array of community service or “survival” initiatives, including the People’s Free Clothing Program depicted here.

Then there are the images within the picture; the images on the wall. There is the iconic poster of Huey Newton seated in a wicker chair brandishing both a sword and a rifle. There are several pieces of art that appear to be the work of Emory Douglas, the Party’s Minister of Culture. There’s also a familiar portrait of Eldridge Cleaver floating just above the boy’s head. This “gallery” links the boy’s sartorial joy and practical needs to the Black Panthers’ style and their politics.