shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.
Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.
It’s nice.

shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.

Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.

It’s nice.

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 
Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 

Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 
Rest In Peace…
to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.
And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 
Zoom Info
shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 
Rest In Peace…
to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.
And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 
Zoom Info
shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 
Rest In Peace…
to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.
And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 
Zoom Info
shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 
Rest In Peace…
to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.
And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 
Zoom Info
shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 
Rest In Peace…
to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.
And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 
Zoom Info

shizukasmack:

therevtimes:

No. 168 “The Unarmed” 

Rest In Peace…

to Michael Brown, John Crawford, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Renisha McBride, Oscar Grant, Sean Bell And the countless other lives that have been taken away from this world due to prejudice.

And an honor to the many people in Ferguson standing up, fighting, hoping that some kind of justice can be had in the midst of chaos.

At last, a new Revolutionary Times comic has arrived. 

blackqueerdo:

Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine to became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her place in the historical record with her book of medical advice for women and children, published in 1883.
Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. An aunt in Pennsylvania, who spent much of her time caring for sick neighbors and may have influenced her career choice, raised her. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened in 1873, she was able to perform such work without any formal training). In 1860, she was admitted to the New England Female Medical College. When she graduated in 1864, Crumpler was the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, and the only African American woman to graduate from the New England Female Medical College, which closed in 1873.
In her Book of Medical Discourses, published in 1883, she gives a brief summary of her career path: “It may be well to state here that, having been reared by a kind aunt in Pennsylvania, whose usefulness with the sick was continually sought, I early conceived a liking for, and sought every opportunity to relieve the sufferings of others. Later in life I devoted my time, when best I could, to nursing as a business, serving under different doctors for a period of eight years (from 1852 to 1860); most of the time at my adopted home in Charlestown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From these doctors I received letters commending me to the faculty of the New England Female Medical College, whence, four years afterward, I received the degree of doctress of medicine.”
Dr. Crumpler practiced in Boston for a short while before moving to Richmond, Virginia, after the Civil War ended in 1865. Richmond, she felt, would be “a proper field for real missionary work, and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women and children. During my stay there nearly every hour was improved in that sphere of labor. The last quarter of the year 1866, I was enabled … to have access each day to a very large number of the indigent, and others of different classes, in a population of over 30,000 colored.” She joined other black physicians caring for freed slaves who would otherwise have had no access to medical care, working with the Freedmen’s Bureau, and missionary and community groups, even though black physicians experienced intense racism working in the postwar South.
“At the close of my services in that city,” she explained, “I returned to my former home, Boston, where I entered into the work with renewed vigor, practicing outside, and receiving children in the house for treatment; regardless, in a measure, of remuneration.” She lived on Joy Street on Beacon Hill, then a mostly black neighborhood. By 1880 she had moved to Hyde Park, Massachusetts, and was no longer in active practice. Her 1883 book is based on journal notes she kept during her years of medical practice.
No photos or other images survive of Dr. Crumpler. The little we know about her comes from the introduction to her book, a remarkable mark of her achievements as a physician and medical writer in a time when very few African Americans were able to gain admittance to medical college, let alone publish. Her book is one of the very first medical publications by an African American.

blackqueerdo:

Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine to became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her place in the historical record with her book of medical advice for women and children, published in 1883.

Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. An aunt in Pennsylvania, who spent much of her time caring for sick neighbors and may have influenced her career choice, raised her. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened in 1873, she was able to perform such work without any formal training). In 1860, she was admitted to the New England Female Medical College. When she graduated in 1864, Crumpler was the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, and the only African American woman to graduate from the New England Female Medical College, which closed in 1873.

In her Book of Medical Discourses, published in 1883, she gives a brief summary of her career path: “It may be well to state here that, having been reared by a kind aunt in Pennsylvania, whose usefulness with the sick was continually sought, I early conceived a liking for, and sought every opportunity to relieve the sufferings of others. Later in life I devoted my time, when best I could, to nursing as a business, serving under different doctors for a period of eight years (from 1852 to 1860); most of the time at my adopted home in Charlestown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From these doctors I received letters commending me to the faculty of the New England Female Medical College, whence, four years afterward, I received the degree of doctress of medicine.”

Dr. Crumpler practiced in Boston for a short while before moving to Richmond, Virginia, after the Civil War ended in 1865. Richmond, she felt, would be “a proper field for real missionary work, and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women and children. During my stay there nearly every hour was improved in that sphere of labor. The last quarter of the year 1866, I was enabled … to have access each day to a very large number of the indigent, and others of different classes, in a population of over 30,000 colored.” She joined other black physicians caring for freed slaves who would otherwise have had no access to medical care, working with the Freedmen’s Bureau, and missionary and community groups, even though black physicians experienced intense racism working in the postwar South.

“At the close of my services in that city,” she explained, “I returned to my former home, Boston, where I entered into the work with renewed vigor, practicing outside, and receiving children in the house for treatment; regardless, in a measure, of remuneration.” She lived on Joy Street on Beacon Hill, then a mostly black neighborhood. By 1880 she had moved to Hyde Park, Massachusetts, and was no longer in active practice. Her 1883 book is based on journal notes she kept during her years of medical practice.

No photos or other images survive of Dr. Crumpler. The little we know about her comes from the introduction to her book, a remarkable mark of her achievements as a physician and medical writer in a time when very few African Americans were able to gain admittance to medical college, let alone publish. Her book is one of the very first medical publications by an African American.

la-negra-barbuda:

today marks 1-year since Islan Nettles was killed in NYC. the lives of Black trans women matter and their voices should not be conveniently silenced in the midst of conversations on the issues white supremacy and police brutality.

Black trans women’s lives matter. Trans women of color lives matter. Don’t contribute to the erasure of trans history.

oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

freshmouthgoddess:

haitianhistory:

freshmouthgoddess:

universalayititoma:

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 
While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.
 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.
Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

Happy Bwa Kayiman Day

of course let’s all erase Cecile Fatiman..cause we know how unimportant Haitian women are /were ..it was just Boukman …..

Hello. I am one of the moderators of Haitian History on Tumblr. I just saw your reply to our Bois Caïman post. We’ve only included Boukman Dutty’s name (in the bottom section of our post) because this is generally the way in which this painting is recognized, and not, as your comment seems to suggests, because of our desire to erase women from Haitian history. We certainly did not go into an enumeration of the presumed people who were at this ceremony and included further readings on the Revolution (*We apologize if you already received this message.)

Cecile Fatiman is not presumed to be missing she was the one presiding over the ceremony not Boukman . she was erased . because Haitian society do not value women just like the world. to erase the Woman who presided over the ceremony .. the grand priestess.. well I take it as an insult as a Haitian woman . of course she does not show up on the painting. Haitian History is written by men. who keep telling us we did not contribute anything to Haitian freedom..we were just there to serve the dudes while they did important stuff… frankly I’m tired of it .. don’t take it personally it just come on for fuck sake the woman presided over the freaking thing .. she guided the ceremony.. but It’ s all about Boukman .and only him ..

freshmouthgoddess:

haitianhistory:

freshmouthgoddess:

universalayititoma:

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 

While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.

 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.

Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

Happy Bwa Kayiman Day

of course let’s all erase Cecile Fatiman..cause we know how unimportant Haitian women are /were ..it was just Boukman …..

Hello. I am one of the moderators of Haitian History on Tumblr. I just saw your reply to our Bois Caïman post. We’ve only included Boukman Dutty’s name (in the bottom section of our post) because this is generally the way in which this painting is recognized, and not, as your comment seems to suggests, because of our desire to erase women from Haitian history. We certainly did not go into an enumeration of the presumed people who were at this ceremony and included further readings on the Revolution (*We apologize if you already received this message.)

Cecile Fatiman is not presumed to be missing she was the one presiding over the ceremony not Boukman . she was erased . because Haitian society do not value women just like the world. to erase the Woman who presided over the ceremony .. the grand priestess.. well I take it as an insult as a Haitian woman . of course she does not show up on the painting. Haitian History is written by men. who keep telling us we did not contribute anything to Haitian freedom..we were just there to serve the dudes while they did important stuff…
frankly I’m tired of it .. don’t take it personally it just come on for fuck sake the woman presided over the freaking thing .. she guided the ceremony.. but It’ s all about Boukman .and only him ..

"Dahomey," by Audre Lorde

In spite of the fire’s heat

the tongs can fetch it.

It was in Abomey that I felt

the full blood of my fathers’ wars

and where I found my mother

Seboulisa

standing with outstretched palms hip high

one breast eaten away by worms of sorrow

magic stones resting upon her fingers

dry as a cough.

In the dooryard of the brass workers

four women joined together dying their cloth

mock Eshu’s iron quiver

standing erect and flamingly familiar

in their dooryard

mute as a porcupine in a forest of lead

In the courtyard of the cloth workers

other brothers and nephews

are stitching bright tapestries

into tales of blood.

    Thunder is a woman with braided hair

spelling the fas of Shango

asleep between sacred pythons

that cannot read

nor eat the ritual offerings

of the Asein.*

My throat in the panther’s lair

is unresisting.

Bearing two drums on my head I speak

whatever language is needed

to sharpen the knives of my tongue

the snake is aware although sleeping

under my blood

since I am a woman whether or not

you are against me

I will braid my hair

even

in the seasons of rain.

*Iron shrines at crossroads honoring the dead.

ofanotherfashion:

Several blogs have posted this photo but, as far as I can tell, there’s no identifying information. I’m posting it here for the same reasons everyone else has posted it - it’s a wonderful photo! But please do let me know if you know anything about it.