oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

freshmouthgoddess:

haitianhistory:

freshmouthgoddess:

universalayititoma:

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 
While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.
 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.
Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

Happy Bwa Kayiman Day

of course let’s all erase Cecile Fatiman..cause we know how unimportant Haitian women are /were ..it was just Boukman …..

Hello. I am one of the moderators of Haitian History on Tumblr. I just saw your reply to our Bois Caïman post. We’ve only included Boukman Dutty’s name (in the bottom section of our post) because this is generally the way in which this painting is recognized, and not, as your comment seems to suggests, because of our desire to erase women from Haitian history. We certainly did not go into an enumeration of the presumed people who were at this ceremony and included further readings on the Revolution (*We apologize if you already received this message.)

Cecile Fatiman is not presumed to be missing she was the one presiding over the ceremony not Boukman . she was erased . because Haitian society do not value women just like the world. to erase the Woman who presided over the ceremony .. the grand priestess.. well I take it as an insult as a Haitian woman . of course she does not show up on the painting. Haitian History is written by men. who keep telling us we did not contribute anything to Haitian freedom..we were just there to serve the dudes while they did important stuff… frankly I’m tired of it .. don’t take it personally it just come on for fuck sake the woman presided over the freaking thing .. she guided the ceremony.. but It’ s all about Boukman .and only him ..

freshmouthgoddess:

haitianhistory:

freshmouthgoddess:

universalayititoma:

haitianhistory:

Today in Haitian History - August 14, 1791 - Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony. 

While historians still debate how many slaves took part of the infamous Bois Caïman Vodou Ceremony (or if it even occurred), very few would deny the emblematic value of the event. Indeed, various accounts maintain that it was precisely during this service that slaves in Northern Saint-Domingue prepared and organized for a major uprising against slave-owners. This uprising soon transformed itself into a large-scale Revolution across the country where temporary associationswere made and destroyed - a moment that we now refer to as the Haitian Revolution.

 * While the events that led to the formation of the Haitian state should not be reduced to a Vodou ceremony, Bois Caïman still, if only symbolically, marks the beginning of a new era and conscience amongst slaves in Saint-Domingue, whereby they agreed that death was better than servitude.

Painting of Bois Caïman Vodou ceremony with Boukman Dutty in its center: Courtesy of Michigan State University. (For reading suggestions on the Haitian Revolution, see here.) 

Happy Bwa Kayiman Day

of course let’s all erase Cecile Fatiman..cause we know how unimportant Haitian women are /were ..it was just Boukman …..

Hello. I am one of the moderators of Haitian History on Tumblr. I just saw your reply to our Bois Caïman post. We’ve only included Boukman Dutty’s name (in the bottom section of our post) because this is generally the way in which this painting is recognized, and not, as your comment seems to suggests, because of our desire to erase women from Haitian history. We certainly did not go into an enumeration of the presumed people who were at this ceremony and included further readings on the Revolution (*We apologize if you already received this message.)

Cecile Fatiman is not presumed to be missing she was the one presiding over the ceremony not Boukman . she was erased . because Haitian society do not value women just like the world. to erase the Woman who presided over the ceremony .. the grand priestess.. well I take it as an insult as a Haitian woman . of course she does not show up on the painting. Haitian History is written by men. who keep telling us we did not contribute anything to Haitian freedom..we were just there to serve the dudes while they did important stuff…
frankly I’m tired of it .. don’t take it personally it just come on for fuck sake the woman presided over the freaking thing .. she guided the ceremony.. but It’ s all about Boukman .and only him ..

"Dahomey," by Audre Lorde

In spite of the fire’s heat

the tongs can fetch it.

It was in Abomey that I felt

the full blood of my fathers’ wars

and where I found my mother

Seboulisa

standing with outstretched palms hip high

one breast eaten away by worms of sorrow

magic stones resting upon her fingers

dry as a cough.

In the dooryard of the brass workers

four women joined together dying their cloth

mock Eshu’s iron quiver

standing erect and flamingly familiar

in their dooryard

mute as a porcupine in a forest of lead

In the courtyard of the cloth workers

other brothers and nephews

are stitching bright tapestries

into tales of blood.

    Thunder is a woman with braided hair

spelling the fas of Shango

asleep between sacred pythons

that cannot read

nor eat the ritual offerings

of the Asein.*

My throat in the panther’s lair

is unresisting.

Bearing two drums on my head I speak

whatever language is needed

to sharpen the knives of my tongue

the snake is aware although sleeping

under my blood

since I am a woman whether or not

you are against me

I will braid my hair

even

in the seasons of rain.

*Iron shrines at crossroads honoring the dead.

ofanotherfashion:

Several blogs have posted this photo but, as far as I can tell, there’s no identifying information. I’m posting it here for the same reasons everyone else has posted it - it’s a wonderful photo! But please do let me know if you know anything about it.

midzilla:

So, I have this massive crush on Janelle Monae. Which resulted in me thinking making this was a good idea.
…seriously.

midzilla:

So, I have this massive crush on Janelle Monae. Which resulted in me thinking making this was a good idea.

…seriously.

Disliking hip-hop doesn’t make you a racist any more than liking hip-hop makes you not a racist, and I’m sure there are plenty of Stormfront enthusiasts with Rick Ross in their iTunes. If you don’t like Jay-Z because you just don’t like the way he sounds, or you’re sick of his cloying ubiquity, or you wish he’d talk about something other than where he’s from for five seconds—hey, I’m not mad, I don’t like Bruce Springsteen for the same reasons. But if you don’t like rap music—a genre that contains multitudes—because of a self-satisfied moralism, or because you’re scared of it, or because you wish those people would stop talking about their problems and get out of your television and radio and kids’ bedrooms: well.

And I’m not just talking about the American right, I’m talking about all the well-meaning white folks who’ve told me how they want to like Lil Wayne but lo, the misogyny, the violence, the drugs. But, but, I’ll say: Bob Dylan aced misogyny; the Rolling Stones sang about violence; the Velvet Underground knew their way around some drugs. Yeeeah, but it’s different, they’ll say, elongating that “yeah” with conspiratorial inflection: you know what I mean. Yeah, I know exactly what you mean.

Rap music doesn’t get unarmed kids shot to death, “it’s different” does. “It’s different” infuses “these assholes always get away” and gives solace to people who hear that sound bite and nod their empty heads in agreement. “It’s different” is the same logic that suggests a teenager’s skin color combined with the music he listened to means he had it coming, and it’s the same logic that lets a bunch of people feign outrage over a teenager’s use of the n-word to describe himself when they’re really just outraged that he beat them to the punch.

“It’s different” makes me shake with anger because it turns music into a dog-whistle to justify the murder of a kid who doesn’t seem all that “different” from me was when I was his age, not that different at all. I liked Skittles and hoodies and weed, too. And yeah, I’m white and never worried about getting shot for any of it, which is only the most loathsome excuse for not identifying with someone that I can possibly think of.

Jack Hamilton, “America Is Dying Slowly: Talking About Hip-Hop After Trayvon Martin” (Good)

he came to collect his people

(via navigatethestream)

muckrakingiswomenswork:

from the way back machine

QUE PASA USA - The Computer Friend Episode pt.3


“Angelito’s not Black man..he’s Cuban” —> peep Angelitos face and listen
Angelito speaks la pura verdad about the stupidity of anti-Blackness in Cubans (5:47)

dynamicafrica:

The language used to describe this chief and his people is critically indicative of the mindset of colonialists who dehumanized the peoples of Africa in order to justify their crimes against them.

dynamicafrica:

The language used to describe this chief and his people is critically indicative of the mindset of colonialists who dehumanized the peoples of Africa in order to justify their crimes against them.