AfroDiaspores

Sep 22

“One of my mentors at Yale, the great anthropologist and art historian Robert Ferris Thompson, has documented that three of the most important words, and thus, concepts, brought to these (and other) shores via Africans are Cool, Funky, and Hip. My argument follows: you can no more separate Black from Cool than you can separate French cooking from France, or yoga from India. Cool has African roots, period. We, Black people, bring the aesthetic of Cool to the table of global culture, and should be recognized intellectually and economically for doing so.” — Rebecca Walker, author of Black Cool (via howtobeterrell)

(via daughterofassata)

Sep 21

[video]

[video]

Sep 20

untitled-1991:

pin-up magazine no 1

untitled-1991:

pin-up magazine no 1

(via foxxxynegrodamus)

Sep 19

[video]

theartofstephen:

"Nganga"
Acrylic on Particle Board 5’x12’

theartofstephen:

"Nganga"

Acrylic on Particle Board 5’x12’

(via odofemi)

[video]

Sep 18

memoriasconsazon:

Lesson #1 of being AfroLatina:

Everyone apparently signed a secret contract to secure the eternal right to tell you what Latinidad and/or Blackness looks like. And guesss wahhhh, neither is youuu!

(via guajirita)

Sep 17

guajirita:

memoriasconsazon:

of course, i believe AfroLatinidad is a consciousness and awareness of ancestry, history, and culture pero let’s not play like every person who identifies as AfroLatinx will be read as Afro or Black & i do think this is important to note because it accounts for another layer of complexity to the reality of AfroLatinxs who are read as Black cus their experience will be shaped by how they’re perceived and how they will be treated based on that perception & what resources//opportunities//points of access will be allotted to them. and along the same vein, of course we gotta be aware of structural and personal obstacles created by shadeism.

I’m not trying to belong and seek liberation with a community and movement that does not see and act on these realities and intersections.

YOOOOOOO I WAS JUST THINKING ABOUT THIS TODAY! 


Naomi Sims for Harper’s Bazaar, December 1968 (via)

Naomi Sims for Harper’s Bazaar, December 1968 (via)

(Source: vintagegal, via chauvinistsushi)

Sep 16

“The question becomes, Whose femininity do we seek to question and most obsessively seek to uncover its “dirty secrets”? Are other women’s beauty so readily dissected and probed in private boundaries made public? Whose beauty is a deceit, needing to be uncovered, and whose is seen as simply an extension of an inherently beautiful and awe inspiring womanhood? And finally, what does it say about the way we view not only Black women, both cis and trans, but women across the board? What does it say about how mistrustful we are of our own femininity and unsure of our own standing in the context of a patriarchal gaze. When womanhood is so readily deconstructed by the very purveyors of its infinite power and mystery, what hope is there for a feminist revolution?

In a society in which womanhood, blackness, and trans womanhood are all pathologized we would do well to collectively challenge hierarchies. What would it look like if we as women collectively pooled our best cards and challenged patriarchy for the grand kitty? How do we expand the definition of womanhood to serve our lives and not the whims of a world that sees us as inherently less than human cut out dolls? Perhaps we can take the bra off womanhood so she breathes a little easier, knock out the wall, and make the powder room a little roomier. Its 2014 and we all need space to fix our makeup and fluff our Lena Horne inspired curls, to take over the World.” — Shaadi Devereaux, Rollersets & Realness: Black Womanhood Defined as Drag Performance (via ethiopienne)

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)

Oshun

Sep 15

doormouseetcappendix:

The Vodu Marvel’s Gods Of Africa 

doormouseetcappendix:

The Vodu Marvel’s Gods Of Africa 

(via aphotic-eniola)

salsteiner:

#7 Juliana Huxtable

salsteiner:

#7 Juliana Huxtable

(via processedlives)

announcing mobmaterial!

hiiii a friend and i have been working hard together to start a new blog, and i’m excited to announce that it’s launching!! it would be great if you could help promote us! (: (if not, i understand)

the blog is called mobmaterial and the point is to create a place that celebrates poc in counter culture/youth subcultures, which are spaces that usually represent only able-bodied, thin cis white people, thereby erasing the presence and contributions of poc. this is a space for all of us to gather, celebrate each other, and share inspiration/art. this is NOT a space for yt’s or cis-males!

moreover, we want to help provide a platform for poc artists, esp those who are just starting out and want more exposure for their work. are you an artist? do you have short stories, spoken word, dance, art, etc that you want to share? this is the space for you!!

please support us as we work to make this blog grow! thank you guys! (: