AfroDiaspores

Jul 31

lustnspace:

Pat Cleveland 1986

lustnspace:

Pat Cleveland 1986

(via fleshtemple)

jcoleknowsbest:

Like clockwork…

- Black folks create art forms(music, style, literary, dance)

- White folks denigrate the said art forms and the creators of that art..

- White folks Figure out how to profit off the creations created from that black struggle

- kumbaya around the fire calling the said art forms creations of that country while erasing the black face from it..

So many countries do/(have done) this..

(via so-treu)

Jul 30

"Young [and Black and Latino/a] Americans take a dim view of Israel’s actions"

A new Pew Research Center poll is the second in the past week to show a huge generational split on the current conflict in Gaza.
Young people are more likely to blame Israel than are Democrats, who blame Hamas more by a 29-26 margin…The only other major demographic groups who blame Israel more than Hamas are African Americans and Hispanics…The poll echoes a Gallup survey from last week…

Talk about burying the lead.

"Young [and Black and Latino/a] Americans take a dim view of Israel’s actions"

A new Pew Research Center poll is the second in the past week to show a huge generational split on the current conflict in Gaza.

Young people are more likely to blame Israel than are Democrats, who blame Hamas more by a 29-26 margin…The only other major demographic groups who blame Israel more than Hamas are African Americans and Hispanics…The poll echoes a Gallup survey from last week…

Talk about burying the lead.

Jul 29

yearningforunity:

Gullah
South Carolina

Alas, kinship isn’t identity—and for some reason, this image has been going around as representing Geechee/Gullah culture in South Carolina and Georgia for a while. Maybe it’s because the photograph was included in an exhibition on Lorenzo Dow Turner, whose research spanned both Sea Island and Bahian culture.
But the photo is actually the famous Brazilian Candomblé priestess Mãe Menininha (1894-1986)—in the front-middle—and her attendants at Ilé Axé Yá Masse temple, in Salvador, Bahia, 1940-41. (It appeared on Tumblr with the correct attribution here three years ago; I’ve reblogged it myself.) Let’s take a minute to appreciate the reality:


The temple that Mãe Menininha headed, the Terreiro do Gantois, is one of the oldest and most respected Candomblé temples in Bahia and is recognized as one of the more orthodox or traditionally African Candomblé centers. The Terreiro do Gantois was actually founded after Mãe Pulquéria diverged from an older temple, Engenho Velho, thought to be one of the oldest Candomblé temples in Bahia. Founded by three freed African women, Engenho Velho traces its history back at least to the 1830s and perhaps even one hundred years earlier…
Mãe Menininha dedicated her life to Candomblé during a time when African religions were still repressed in Brazil. She suffered imprisonment and violent persecution by the police due to her involvement with Candomblé. Her resistance to these discriminatory governmental policies against Afro- Brazilian religious practices was essential for the survival of Candomblé as an important part of Brazilian culture…

yearningforunity:

Gullah

South Carolina

Alas, kinship isn’t identity—and for some reason, this image has been going around as representing Geechee/Gullah culture in South Carolina and Georgia for a while. Maybe it’s because the photograph was included in an exhibition on Lorenzo Dow Turner, whose research spanned both Sea Island and Bahian culture.

But the photo is actually the famous Brazilian Candomblé priestess Mãe Menininha (1894-1986)—in the front-middle—and her attendants at Ilé Axé Yá Masse temple, in Salvador, Bahia, 1940-41. (It appeared on Tumblr with the correct attribution here three years ago; I’ve reblogged it myself.) Let’s take a minute to appreciate the reality:

The temple that Mãe Menininha headed, the Terreiro do Gantois, is one of the oldest and most respected Candomblé temples in Bahia and is recognized as one of the more orthodox or traditionally African Candomblé centers. The Terreiro do Gantois was actually founded after Mãe Pulquéria diverged from an older temple, Engenho Velho, thought to be one of the oldest Candomblé temples in Bahia. Founded by three freed African women, Engenho Velho traces its history back at least to the 1830s and perhaps even one hundred years earlier…

Mãe Menininha dedicated her life to Candomblé during a time when African religions were still repressed in Brazil. She suffered imprisonment and violent persecution by the police due to her involvement with Candomblé. Her resistance to these discriminatory governmental policies against Afro- Brazilian religious practices was essential for the survival of Candomblé as an important part of Brazilian culture…

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

Jul 28

a haiku for the bus driver who deliberately drove past me

geekscoutcookies:

l7one:

I swear to god bruh
Let me catch you in the streets
Bruh I swear to god

Still funny as hell

(Source: slimmof112)

Jul 27

killyourinspiration:

andibgoode:

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”
- http://demenshea.com

!!!

My hero!

killyourinspiration:

andibgoode:

britewings:

“Known as the Motorcycle Queen of Miami, Bessie Stringfield started riding when she was 16. She was the first African-American woman to travel cross-country solo, and she did it at age 19 in 1929, riding a 1928 Indian Scout. Bessie traveled through all of the lower 48 states during the ’30s and ’40s at a time when the country was rife with prejudice and hatred. She later rode in Europe, Brazil, and Haiti and during World War II she served as one of the few motorcycle despatch riders for the United States military.”

http://demenshea.com

!!!

My hero!

(via so-treu)

Jul 26

[video]

Jul 25

(via howtobeterrell)

Jul 24

Haitian Vodou is a religion that is very misunderstood. Slaves were brought to the Caribbean against their will and forbidden to practice their traditional African religions as well as forced to convert to the religion of their masters. The Bond movie/Eurocentric/Americanized viewpoint presents Vodou as an evil, primitive version of witchcraft. But it’s a religion like any other, with a moral code, gods and goddesses. Many ceremonies deal with protection from evil spirits.

In addition, the “voodoo doll” itself has been misconstrued. In Haiti, it was traditional to nail small handmade puppets or dolls to trees near graveyards; these small figures were meant to act as messengers to the spirit world, and contact dead loved ones. It’s safe to imagine that European folks didn’t understand this — and assumed an evil intent behind a doll with nails in its body.

” —

Dodai Stewart, Deconstructing Florence + The Machine’s New Racist Video (via yyytsirk)

Relevant quote.

(via pagansofcolor)

(via lareinaana)

Jul 23

“Black is the queen of colors.” — Auguste Rodin   (via thecolorblu)

(Source: mycolorbook, via thecolorblu)

Jul 22

minniemayjors:

Hair, makeup, and wardrobe by Briana CecePhoto by Charles Long Photography

minniemayjors:


Hair, makeup, and wardrobe by Briana Cece
Photo by Charles Long Photography

(via freshmouthgoddess)

Jul 21

lecoil:

Man Moment: Jean-Sebastien Pougnand, model, musician, and fashion consultant. Photo by Olivia Rose for i-D.

lecoil:

Man Moment: Jean-Sebastien Pougnand, model, musician, and fashion consultant. Photo by Olivia Rose for i-D.

(via talesofthestarshipregeneration)

Jul 20

vintageblackglamour:

Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba in 1926. Photo circa 1940s. This is one of the first pictures I shared on VBG, found via Scott Schuman’s fantastic blog, The Sartorialist. It was submitted by Ms. Frias’s daughter, Ena Frias, and she provided this description to The Sartorialist:"This is my beautiful mother, Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba on March 23, 1926. This photograph was taken sometime in the mid to late 1940’s. I believe she was at a christening of a friend’s child in Havana. She was an amazing and inspirational woman - making her way to the US with my father by way of Miami in late 1959, and ending up in New York City two years later, where I was born and raised. She was always a fashionista and had that amazing aura that exuded beauty, charm and grace. And boy could she pose for a picture, eh? She always will be my very own personal style icon.”

vintageblackglamour:

Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba in 1926. Photo circa 1940s. This is one of the first pictures I shared on VBG, found via Scott Schuman’s fantastic blog, The Sartorialist. It was submitted by Ms. Frias’s daughter, Ena Frias, and she provided this description to The Sartorialist:

"This is my beautiful mother, Valeria Perojo Frias, born in Pinar del Rio, Cuba on March 23, 1926. This photograph was taken sometime in the mid to late 1940’s. I believe she was at a christening of a friend’s child in Havana. She was an amazing and inspirational woman - making her way to the US with my father by way of Miami in late 1959, and ending up in New York City two years later, where I was born and raised. She was always a fashionista and had that amazing aura that exuded beauty, charm and grace. And boy could she pose for a picture, eh? She always will be my very own personal style icon.”

(via thechanelmuse)

Jul 19

(Source: theloveunlimited, via thechanelmuse)

Jul 18

“One of the few things that I disdained while filming the movie was the makeup used to paint the Puerto Ricans the same color. We Sharks were all the same homogenous brown! Our gang, including me, was a uniform tobacco color, and that was just plain wrong and inaccurate. Puerto Ricans, with their varied genetic ancestry – Spanish, Taino Indian, Black, Dutch – are born with a broad palette of skin colors, from outright white to true black.” — Rita Moreno on filming West Side Story in her memoir Rita Moreno (via thatsnotwhatiheard)

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)