AfroDiaspores

Aug 21

[video]

"Backstage at the Evisu Ball, Manhattan, 2010," by Gerard H. Gaskin. In Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene,

Gerard H. Gaskin’s radiant color and black-and-white photographs take us inside the culture of house balls, underground events where gay and transgender men and women, mostly African American and Latino, come together to see and be seen. At balls, high-spirited late-night pageants, members of particular “houses”—the House of Blahnik, the House of Xtravaganza—”walk,” competing for trophies in categories based on costume, attitude, dance moves, and “realness.” In this exuberant world of artistry and self-fashioning, people often marginalized for being who they are can flaunt and celebrate their most vibrant, spectacular selves.

From the quiet backstage, to the shimmering energies of the runway. to the electricity of the crowd, Gaskin’s photographs take us to the ball. Legendary, comprised of photos taken at events in the New York city area, Philadelphia, Richmond, and Washington, D.C., is a collaboration between Gaskin, a camera-laden outsider who has been attending balls for twenty years, and the house members who let him enter the intimate world of ball culture…

"Backstage at the Evisu Ball, Manhattan, 2010," by Gerard H. Gaskin. In Legendary: Inside the House Ballroom Scene,

Gerard H. Gaskin’s radiant color and black-and-white photographs take us inside the culture of house balls, underground events where gay and transgender men and women, mostly African American and Latino, come together to see and be seen. At balls, high-spirited late-night pageants, members of particular “houses”—the House of Blahnik, the House of Xtravaganza—”walk,” competing for trophies in categories based on costume, attitude, dance moves, and “realness.” In this exuberant world of artistry and self-fashioning, people often marginalized for being who they are can flaunt and celebrate their most vibrant, spectacular selves.

From the quiet backstage, to the shimmering energies of the runway. to the electricity of the crowd, Gaskin’s photographs take us to the ball. Legendary, comprised of photos taken at events in the New York city area, Philadelphia, Richmond, and Washington, D.C., is a collaboration between Gaskin, a camera-laden outsider who has been attending balls for twenty years, and the house members who let him enter the intimate world of ball culture…

[video]

sourcedumal:

dynastylnoire:

note-a-bear:

dynastylnoire:

blackhistoryalbum:

The Black Victorians | Circa Late 1800s
Source: My Ancestor’s Name

someone cosplay her immediately

how much you wanna bet she was hunting vampires

LISTEN!!!! Someone make this a thing!!!!

I need this.

sourcedumal:

dynastylnoire:

note-a-bear:

dynastylnoire:

blackhistoryalbum:

The Black Victorians | Circa Late 1800s

Source: My Ancestor’s Name

someone cosplay her immediately

how much you wanna bet she was hunting vampires

LISTEN!!!! Someone make this a thing!!!!

I need this.

(via fleshtemple)

Aug 20

2headedsnake:

andyward.co.uk
Andy Ward, ‘Charlie Parker’

2headedsnake:

andyward.co.uk

Andy Ward, ‘Charlie Parker’

(via loveonmysleeve-deactivated20120)

Aug 19

chescaleigh:


Source (x)

WOW.

chescaleigh:

Source (x)

WOW.

(Source: uastis, via theblackoaksyndicate)


Ferguson

Ferguson

(Source: unetdemi, via foxxxynegrodamus)

shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.
Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.
It’s nice.

shesthedifferencemaker:

I really like this picture.  Whenever we see pics of people doing black girls hair, there is always frowning and angry faces like its such a struggle.

Here the little girl is smiling and content while her mother(??) is gently and patiently tending to her hair.

It’s nice.

(Source: qweent, via fleshtemple)

Aug 18

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 
Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

pretty-period:

"But you see now baby, whether you have a Ph.D., D.D., or No D, we’re in this bag together. And whether you are from Morehouse or Nohouse, we’re still in this bag together." Fannie Lou Hamer. Photo taken in 1963 

Giving thanks to Kyra Gaunt for the reminder. #Ferguson #MikeBrown #DontShoot

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

[video]

blackqueerdo:

Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine to became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her place in the historical record with her book of medical advice for women and children, published in 1883.
Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. An aunt in Pennsylvania, who spent much of her time caring for sick neighbors and may have influenced her career choice, raised her. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened in 1873, she was able to perform such work without any formal training). In 1860, she was admitted to the New England Female Medical College. When she graduated in 1864, Crumpler was the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, and the only African American woman to graduate from the New England Female Medical College, which closed in 1873.
In her Book of Medical Discourses, published in 1883, she gives a brief summary of her career path: “It may be well to state here that, having been reared by a kind aunt in Pennsylvania, whose usefulness with the sick was continually sought, I early conceived a liking for, and sought every opportunity to relieve the sufferings of others. Later in life I devoted my time, when best I could, to nursing as a business, serving under different doctors for a period of eight years (from 1852 to 1860); most of the time at my adopted home in Charlestown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From these doctors I received letters commending me to the faculty of the New England Female Medical College, whence, four years afterward, I received the degree of doctress of medicine.”
Dr. Crumpler practiced in Boston for a short while before moving to Richmond, Virginia, after the Civil War ended in 1865. Richmond, she felt, would be “a proper field for real missionary work, and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women and children. During my stay there nearly every hour was improved in that sphere of labor. The last quarter of the year 1866, I was enabled … to have access each day to a very large number of the indigent, and others of different classes, in a population of over 30,000 colored.” She joined other black physicians caring for freed slaves who would otherwise have had no access to medical care, working with the Freedmen’s Bureau, and missionary and community groups, even though black physicians experienced intense racism working in the postwar South.
“At the close of my services in that city,” she explained, “I returned to my former home, Boston, where I entered into the work with renewed vigor, practicing outside, and receiving children in the house for treatment; regardless, in a measure, of remuneration.” She lived on Joy Street on Beacon Hill, then a mostly black neighborhood. By 1880 she had moved to Hyde Park, Massachusetts, and was no longer in active practice. Her 1883 book is based on journal notes she kept during her years of medical practice.
No photos or other images survive of Dr. Crumpler. The little we know about her comes from the introduction to her book, a remarkable mark of her achievements as a physician and medical writer in a time when very few African Americans were able to gain admittance to medical college, let alone publish. Her book is one of the very first medical publications by an African American.

blackqueerdo:

Rebecca Lee Crumpler challenged the prejudice that prevented African Americans from pursuing careers in medicine to became the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, a distinction formerly credited to Rebecca Cole. Although little has survived to tell the story of Crumpler’s life, she has secured her place in the historical record with her book of medical advice for women and children, published in 1883.

Crumpler was born in 1831 in Delaware, to Absolum Davis and Matilda Webber. An aunt in Pennsylvania, who spent much of her time caring for sick neighbors and may have influenced her career choice, raised her. By 1852 she had moved to Charlestown, Massachusetts, where she worked as a nurse for the next eight years (because the first formal school for nursing only opened in 1873, she was able to perform such work without any formal training). In 1860, she was admitted to the New England Female Medical College. When she graduated in 1864, Crumpler was the first African American woman in the United States to earn an M.D. degree, and the only African American woman to graduate from the New England Female Medical College, which closed in 1873.

In her Book of Medical Discourses, published in 1883, she gives a brief summary of her career path: “It may be well to state here that, having been reared by a kind aunt in Pennsylvania, whose usefulness with the sick was continually sought, I early conceived a liking for, and sought every opportunity to relieve the sufferings of others. Later in life I devoted my time, when best I could, to nursing as a business, serving under different doctors for a period of eight years (from 1852 to 1860); most of the time at my adopted home in Charlestown, Middlesex County, Massachusetts. From these doctors I received letters commending me to the faculty of the New England Female Medical College, whence, four years afterward, I received the degree of doctress of medicine.”

Dr. Crumpler practiced in Boston for a short while before moving to Richmond, Virginia, after the Civil War ended in 1865. Richmond, she felt, would be “a proper field for real missionary work, and one that would present ample opportunities to become acquainted with the diseases of women and children. During my stay there nearly every hour was improved in that sphere of labor. The last quarter of the year 1866, I was enabled … to have access each day to a very large number of the indigent, and others of different classes, in a population of over 30,000 colored.” She joined other black physicians caring for freed slaves who would otherwise have had no access to medical care, working with the Freedmen’s Bureau, and missionary and community groups, even though black physicians experienced intense racism working in the postwar South.

“At the close of my services in that city,” she explained, “I returned to my former home, Boston, where I entered into the work with renewed vigor, practicing outside, and receiving children in the house for treatment; regardless, in a measure, of remuneration.” She lived on Joy Street on Beacon Hill, then a mostly black neighborhood. By 1880 she had moved to Hyde Park, Massachusetts, and was no longer in active practice. Her 1883 book is based on journal notes she kept during her years of medical practice.

No photos or other images survive of Dr. Crumpler. The little we know about her comes from the introduction to her book, a remarkable mark of her achievements as a physician and medical writer in a time when very few African Americans were able to gain admittance to medical college, let alone publish. Her book is one of the very first medical publications by an African American.

Aug 17

la-negra-barbuda:

today marks 1-year since Islan Nettles was killed in NYC. the lives of Black trans women matter and their voices should not be conveniently silenced in the midst of conversations on the issues white supremacy and police brutality.

Black trans women’s lives matter. Trans women of color lives matter. Don’t contribute to the erasure of trans history.

mybutbeautiful:

Hey Joe…!
celebritycameraclub:

Jimmy Hendrix with a Polaroid

mybutbeautiful:

Hey Joe…!

celebritycameraclub:

Jimmy Hendrix with a Polaroid

(Source: )

Aug 16

adeola:

I be Yoruba.

adeola:

be Yoruba.

(via fleshtemple)

Aug 15

oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

oreeoriginol:

In October of 2013, Andy Lopez who was just 13 years old was shot to death by Sonoma County Sheffis Deputy Erick Gelhaus. Andy was walking to a friends house carrying a toy gun designed to look like an AK-47. After being spotted by the police, they stopped and told him to drop his gun. Without allowing him enough time to properly react to the deputy’s orders, Andy was shot 7 times killing him atthe scene. It has been revealed that the deputy, Erick Gelhaus has a history of using excessive force and the Sonoma County Sheriff’s office was aware of it. He is also a firearms instructor who has been accused of having “racist and extremist tendencies and beliefs”. Last week Andy Lopez would of celebrated his 14th birthday. Instead, his family continues to fight for justice. There is an epidemic happening in our streets where police officers continue to criminalize and terrorize our black and brown community members. Continue to demand that the DA prosecute Sheriff Deputy Erick Gelhaus for his crime. PLEASE SHARE!!!!!

(via tiarasofspanishmoss)