• Me: What do you even call a group of black women? Is that a pride? Like lions?
  • Him: A blessing.

(KICKSTARTER TO HELP DR. GLORIA JOSEPH PUBLISH A BOOK ABOUT HER LATE PARTNER, AUDRE LORDE) The Wind is Spirit: The life, love and legacy of Audre Lorde The Book is written and edited by Dr. Gloria Joseph
Poet, warrior, feminist, mother, pioneer, lover, survivor….just a few of the adjectives used to describe Audre Lorde. As author of numerous books of poetry and prose and the subject of several biographies and documentaries Lorde’s journey has been chronicled, anthologized and mythologized. And although the life and works of Audre Lorde are widely known, her full story remains untold.  But her story can’t be told as a straight narrative with time stamped events neatly bound between the pages. Lorde lived her life out and out loud. Her spirit is like the wind so instead of trying to capture it, we’ll let it blow free and loosely weave together a tapestry of essays, photos, recollections to create a book written and edited by Dr. Gloria Joseph to tell some of the stories of Audre Lorde.
Our book is celebration of Audre Lorde told in living color and vividly narrated with photography.  It’s a words and pictures way to honor her legacy and tell the story of her turbulent and triumphant life.   Dr. Joseph has selected a diverse group of contributors who have submitted personal essays, stories, poems, recollections and memoirs that show how Lorde’s words and vision inspired and impacted others to be the best they can be.  
The Book will be told in Griot style and will take the reader through the defining periods of Lorde’s life as well as include rememberances from her three major memorial services in New York, Berlin and St. Croix.

(KICKSTARTER TO HELP DR. GLORIA JOSEPH PUBLISH A BOOK ABOUT HER LATE PARTNER, AUDRE LORDE) The Wind is Spirit: The life, love and legacy of Audre Lorde The Book is written and edited by Dr. Gloria Joseph

Poet, warrior, feminist, mother, pioneer, lover, survivor….just a few of the adjectives used to describe Audre Lorde. As author of numerous books of poetry and prose and the subject of several biographies and documentaries Lorde’s journey has been chronicled, anthologized and mythologized. And although the life and works of Audre Lorde are widely known, her full story remains untold.  But her story can’t be told as a straight narrative with time stamped events neatly bound between the pages. Lorde lived her life out and out loud. Her spirit is like the wind so instead of trying to capture it, we’ll let it blow free and loosely weave together a tapestry of essays, photos, recollections to create a book written and edited by Dr. Gloria Joseph to tell some of the stories of Audre Lorde.

Our book is celebration of Audre Lorde told in living color and vividly narrated with photography.  It’s a words and pictures way to honor her legacy and tell the story of her turbulent and triumphant life.   Dr. Joseph has selected a diverse group of contributors who have submitted personal essays, stories, poems, recollections and memoirs that show how Lorde’s words and vision inspired and impacted others to be the best they can be.  

The Book will be told in Griot style and will take the reader through the defining periods of Lorde’s life as well as include rememberances from her three major memorial services in New York, Berlin and St. Croix.

According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info
According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.
The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…
The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…
The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.
Zoom Info

According to The Tar Baby and the Tomahawk: Race and Ethnic Images in American Children’s Literature, 1880-1939:

The Brownies’ Book…was the first sustained effort to create a body of writing that exclusively addressed the needs of African American children. The magazine ran from January 1920 to December 1921 under the editorship of W. E. B. Du Bois, Augustus Granville Dill (who served as business manager) and Jessie Fauset (as literary editor in 1920 and managing editor in 1921). The Brownies’ Book was comprised of stories (folktales, fantasies, as well as more realistic stories), poems, games, articles on current events, and photographs of and letters from young readers. It celebrated African American identity, urged racial pride, and encouraged its young readers to aspire to positions of leadership within their communities.

The content of Du Bois’s Brownies’ Book showcased his opposition to the social philosophy espoused by Booker T. Washington and provided an alternative vision of the ideal education for African Americans. Rudine Sims Bishop notes that “Du Bois resolutely demanded excellence in education for Black children, including a strong foundation in reading, writing, and especially thinking”…

The Brownies’ Book was instrumental in promoting future African American children’s literature. It advertised and sold books for African American children that were not readily available in bookstores, including works by Benjamin Brawley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and W. E. B. Du Bois…

The Brownies’ Book also provided a venue for young aspiring writers and helped to propel future careers in and beyond the field of children’s writing. 

See and read issues of The Brownies’ Book here.

farfrompaid:

*Unarmed Black person gets killed by police*
“It’s not about race they had to have done something to deserve it.”

*Black person gets a job or goes to a college*
“This is obviously about race there is nothing they could have done to deserve it.”


La última cena, dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1976

A masterpiece concisely described by William Luis:

Gutiérrez Alea also directed the La última cena (Last Supper, 1977), a film based on a late-eighteenth-century count who was torn between his Christian beliefs and his economic interest in meeting sugar production. The film parodies Christ’s Last Supper; the count invites twelve of his slaves to dine with him. As the night unfolds and all have consumed wine, the master reveals a human side, and the slaves notice[ ] that they and the master are not that different. In a moment of weakness, the count concedes that the slaves should rest and not work on Good Friday. However, the next day, the overseer, who was not privy to the conversation, forces the slaves to work, which causes the slaves to protest and rebel. All who dined with the count are found and killed, except for Sebastián, who with the help of African religion, lives to continue the fight against slavery.
Zoom Info

La última cena, dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1976

A masterpiece concisely described by William Luis:

Gutiérrez Alea also directed the La última cena (Last Supper, 1977), a film based on a late-eighteenth-century count who was torn between his Christian beliefs and his economic interest in meeting sugar production. The film parodies Christ’s Last Supper; the count invites twelve of his slaves to dine with him. As the night unfolds and all have consumed wine, the master reveals a human side, and the slaves notice[ ] that they and the master are not that different. In a moment of weakness, the count concedes that the slaves should rest and not work on Good Friday. However, the next day, the overseer, who was not privy to the conversation, forces the slaves to work, which causes the slaves to protest and rebel. All who dined with the count are found and killed, except for Sebastián, who with the help of African religion, lives to continue the fight against slavery.
Zoom Info

La última cena, dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1976

A masterpiece concisely described by William Luis:

Gutiérrez Alea also directed the La última cena (Last Supper, 1977), a film based on a late-eighteenth-century count who was torn between his Christian beliefs and his economic interest in meeting sugar production. The film parodies Christ’s Last Supper; the count invites twelve of his slaves to dine with him. As the night unfolds and all have consumed wine, the master reveals a human side, and the slaves notice[ ] that they and the master are not that different. In a moment of weakness, the count concedes that the slaves should rest and not work on Good Friday. However, the next day, the overseer, who was not privy to the conversation, forces the slaves to work, which causes the slaves to protest and rebel. All who dined with the count are found and killed, except for Sebastián, who with the help of African religion, lives to continue the fight against slavery.
Zoom Info
La última cena, dir. Tomás Gutiérrez Alea, 1976

A masterpiece concisely described by William Luis:

Gutiérrez Alea also directed the La última cena (Last Supper, 1977), a film based on a late-eighteenth-century count who was torn between his Christian beliefs and his economic interest in meeting sugar production. The film parodies Christ’s Last Supper; the count invites twelve of his slaves to dine with him. As the night unfolds and all have consumed wine, the master reveals a human side, and the slaves notice[ ] that they and the master are not that different. In a moment of weakness, the count concedes that the slaves should rest and not work on Good Friday. However, the next day, the overseer, who was not privy to the conversation, forces the slaves to work, which causes the slaves to protest and rebel. All who dined with the count are found and killed, except for Sebastián, who with the help of African religion, lives to continue the fight against slavery.

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

T’Ain’t Nobody’s Bizness: Queer Blues Divas of the 1920s

Like Frameline Voices? Donate here: bit.ly/FramelineDonate

T’Ain’t Nobody’s Bizness exposes the triply oppressed (black, female, queer) pioneers of blues through interviews with cultural historians, vintage photos, footage, and recordings, all narrated by Jewelle Gomez. With lavish costumes and sexually suggestive lyrics, bisexual and lesbian singers such as Ma Rainey (got arrested for indecency at an all-girl party—while married to a man) and Gladys Bentley (a “bulldagger” in full tuxedo) were regularly shunned by the church and society for their rough and tumble ways. 

Robert Philipson 2011 29 min. USA

Founded in 1977, Frameline is the nation’s only nonprofit organization solely dedicated to the funding, exhibition, distribution and promotion of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender media arts. Frameline Voices is a new digital initiative that showcases diverse LGBT stories and expands access to films by and about people of color, transgender people, youth, and elders.

More information: http://frameline.org

il-tenore-regina:

vivelareine:

—Marie Antoinette (2006)

 Just so everyone is clear, the handsome Black man tutoring Marie Antoinette is Joseph Boulogne, classical musician extraordinaire whose work influenced Mozart’s. This has been your Western music history tidbit of the day. Adieu! 
Zoom Info
il-tenore-regina:

vivelareine:

—Marie Antoinette (2006)

 Just so everyone is clear, the handsome Black man tutoring Marie Antoinette is Joseph Boulogne, classical musician extraordinaire whose work influenced Mozart’s. This has been your Western music history tidbit of the day. Adieu! 
Zoom Info

il-tenore-regina:

vivelareine:

—Marie Antoinette (2006)

 Just so everyone is clear, the handsome Black man tutoring Marie Antoinette is Joseph Boulogne, classical musician extraordinaire whose work influenced Mozart’s. This has been your Western music history tidbit of the day. Adieu! 

Black studies scholars seek greater understanding and excavations of silences, gaps, and erasures of resistances by probing not only the outspoken performances, but also those practices that are often veiled or dissembled. We unravel and reveal the myriad rituals and cultural creations that nurture and sustain oppositional consciousness while appearing to signal acquiescence, accommodation, and adaptation. In fact, these activities are often indicative of the transformative realities and alternate futures that already exist; black studies’ continued flourishing under hostile conditions is living proof of these realities.

Hine, Darlene Clark. “A Black Studies Manifesto: Characteristics of a Black Studies Mind.” The Black Scholar 44, no. 2 (July 1, 2014): 11–15.

"In fact, these activities are often indicative of the transformative realities and alternate futures that already exist…." 

Because you didn’t hear her the first time.

(via jmjafrx)