albatrosszine:

image

London Stereoscopic Company studios, c. 1891-93. 

On September 7, The Black Chronicles II opens at Rivington Place in London.

The Black Chronicles II is a newly curated exhibition exploring black presences (African and Asian) in 19th and early 20th century Britain, through the prism of studio photography.

Find more info here

blackhistorytheremix:

Twenty years before NWA screamed “Fuck tha Police” Marsha P. Johnson was in the streets of New York throwing shoes at them (so the story goes). Marsha P. Johnson (June 27, 1944 – July 6, 1992) aka “the Saint of Christopher Street” was an iconic trans* rights activist. She was a leader in the resistance against police harassment in what we know as the Stonewall Riots. She also was the cofounder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.)

blackhistorytheremix:

Twenty years before NWA screamed “Fuck tha Police” Marsha P. Johnson was in the streets of New York throwing shoes at them (so the story goes). Marsha P. Johnson (June 27, 1944 – July 6, 1992) aka “the Saint of Christopher Street” was an iconic trans* rights activist. She was a leader in the resistance against police harassment in what we know as the Stonewall Riots. She also was the cofounder of Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.)

so-treu:

stumblequeen:

dear so-treu,
you are the one-armed mermaid queen of the stormy seas inside of me.
lovestumblequeen
p.s. i’m sorry this isn’t a better expression of my love but i have been really deeply unartistic lately so please just take it as a compliment of the highest order that in that time, you were my muse.
[ref images from all over the place really, including my favorite pic of treu everr and this person’s mermaid tail (found via internet search)]
(also thank you bella for your input — very hepful i love you)

this is so amazing and breathtaking and touching and i want to plaster it everywhere and use it for everything. thank you, so much. from the bottom of my heart, bb. <3333

so-treu:

stumblequeen:

dear so-treu,

you are the one-armed mermaid queen of the stormy seas inside of me.

love
stumblequeen

p.s. i’m sorry this isn’t a better expression of my love but i have been really deeply unartistic lately so please just take it as a compliment of the highest order that in that time, you were my muse.

[ref images from all over the place really, including my favorite pic of treu everr and this person’s mermaid tail (found via internet search)]

(also thank you bella for your input — very hepful i love you)

this is so amazing and breathtaking and touching and i want to plaster it everywhere and use it for everything. thank you, so much. from the bottom of my heart, bb. <3333

nomorewaterthefirenexttime:

The ‘MHP’ Black Feminism Syllabus

newwavefeminism:

newwavefeminism:

The link has a video to the open letter, the syllabus is below:

Cooper, Anna Julia. A Voice From the South.

Hunter, Tera.  To ‘Joy My Freedom: Southern Black Women’s Lives and Labors After the Civil War.

Lorde, Audre. Zami: A New Spelling of My Name.

Ransby, Barbara. Ella Baker and the Black Freedom Movement: A Radical Democratic Vision.

Shange, Ntozke. For colored girls who have considered suicide/When the rainbow is enuf.

Theoharis, Jeanne. The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks.

I found myself in need of new literature to pick up before the school year begins again, great place to start - repost in case others are also looking for new things to read

eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher
Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).
When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”
[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]
Zoom Info
eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher
Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).
When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”
[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]
Zoom Info
eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher
Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).
When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”
[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]
Zoom Info
eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher
Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).
When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”
[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]
Zoom Info
eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher
Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).
When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”
[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]
Zoom Info

eternallybeautifullyblack:

A Unique African-American Culture, Hundreds of Years Old, That Could Go Extinct 

By Jordan G. Teicher

Growing up in Beaufort, South Carolina, in the 1970s, Pete Marovich often overheard locals speaking “a rapid-fire language that sounded similar to English.” At the time, he had no idea then that it was a dialect that had been passed down from their enslaved African ancestors, or that it was just a small piece of the distinct and rich culture of the Gullah people, who’d maintained a strong connection to their roots as, generation after generation, they remained along the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia (where they’re known as Geechee).

When Marovich moved to Hilton Head Island in the 1990s, he started meeting Gullah people and learning about their history and culture. Brought to America from “the primarily rice-producing regions of West and Central Africa,” the Gullah/Geechee people worked the plantations of the American southeast, where they “developed a separate creole language and distinct culture patterns that included more of their African cultural traditions than the African-American populations in other parts of the United States.”

[Continue reading article and view more pictures at Slate Magazine.]

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 
Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

juliedillon:

This is an illustration I did for the August 2014 issue of Popular Science Magazine. The assignment was to show a scifi take on human aging in the future. I wanted to do something relatively positive, so I drew a lady whose life has been been prolonged through cybernetic enhancements and augmentation, so she gets to spend time with her great-great-great-great grandchildren. 

Thanks to AD Michelle Mruk!

richestwhiteboy:

Feminist — There is no Iggy, Lana, Marina, or Lorde in this mix. No white feminism here, bye.
i. Flawless BEYONCEii. Fxxk Boyz Get Money FEMMiii. Bad Girls M.I.Aiv. Long Way 2 Go CASSIEv. I Am The Best 2NE1vi. Muny NICKI MINAJvii. Queen JANELLE MONAEviii. Sexy, Naughty, Bitchy TATA YOUNGix. Anaconda NICKI MINAJx. Truth Or Dare GAINxi. Problem NATALIA KILLSxii. BO$$ FIFTH HARMONYxiii. I Am Your Leader NICKI MINAJ

richestwhiteboy:

FeministThere is no Iggy, Lana, Marina, or Lorde in this mix. No white feminism here, bye.

i. Flawless BEYONCE
ii. Fxxk Boyz Get Money FEMM
iii. Bad Girls M.I.A
iv. Long Way 2 Go CASSIE
v. I Am The Best 2NE1
vi. Muny NICKI MINAJ
vii. Queen JANELLE MONAE
viii. Sexy, Naughty, Bitchy TATA YOUNG
ix. Anaconda NICKI MINAJ
x. Truth Or Dare GAIN
xi. Problem NATALIA KILLS
xii. BO$$ FIFTH HARMONY
xiii. I Am Your Leader NICKI MINAJ

He had the most beautiful eyes. They were brown and therefore retained much of their information. You could not read them instantly like blue eyes. You had to keep looking, you had to study. Like searching for familiar forms in a darkened room. And there were sparks of mischief firing along the thin gold wires that streaked the iris. They were loyal eyes. Deeper, there was warmth, almost a glow. Just the crumbs from a fire, smoldering on. I loved when his eyelashes twitched and he blinked, and suddenly happiness was there inside his eyes. Unmistakable. Like a single word printed on a clean white page. I love seeing that word in his eyes.

Augusten Burroughs

Source: http://exploringpathlesswoods.tumblr.com/

(via exploringpathlesswoods)

One of my mentors at Yale, the great anthropologist and art historian Robert Ferris Thompson, has documented that three of the most important words, and thus, concepts, brought to these (and other) shores via Africans are Cool, Funky, and Hip. My argument follows: you can no more separate Black from Cool than you can separate French cooking from France, or yoga from India. Cool has African roots, period. We, Black people, bring the aesthetic of Cool to the table of global culture, and should be recognized intellectually and economically for doing so.

Rebecca Walker, author of Black Cool (via howtobeterrell)